The Problem With Plans

It’s moments after the New Year, and everyone is talking about goals and resolutions and focus words. Diets are starting, gyms are full, and your neighbor says hi as she jogs by each morning.

That’s all well and good for her, but you’re already juggling so much on your plate that you can’t imagine adding anything, goal or not. You’re just happy to keep everything on your plate and everyone around you semi-reasonably happy. You’ve got your job, your kids, your volunteer hours, your meal plans, your husband, your friends, your quiet time, your ___________. Any jogging neighbor would be flummoxed to have to juggle all that. She would grovel if she knew how much you were maintaining, and, she’d of course, toast your success and encourage you “Keep up the good work. You’re a model to society” if she knew how much you were maintaining.

There’s no room for goals, for plans. It’s all about survival of the fittest, right? . . . Right?

::cue crickets::

I think we all know there’s an inherent good in planning and making goals. But many of us have reasoned away why it’s good for others but not for us. Sure, we see the potential benefit, but then we value our organized chaos a little more, label ourselves as “eccentric,” and hush that still quiet voice that tries to argue otherwise.

Let’s stop the justifying for just a moment, and let that little voice in our hearts speak for a moment.

What’s it saying?

Go ahead, say it out loud or write it down no matter how preposterous it sounds. Give it a moment to let your brain process without smothering it with justifications of why that’s impossible.

Is it “impossible”?

Really?

REALLY?

REALLY?

Or does it just overwhelm you, so you justify it away instead of facing it head on?

Here’s the problem with plans. They work. Actually, they’re biblical. And no matter how you dice it, no matter what your personality, they make a difference and propel you in the right direction.

We are told to write the vision down so that we can run with it (Hab. 2:2). Jeremiah 29:11 says that God knows the PLANS He has for our lives. If plans are good enough for God, then we are definitely NOT above having plans for our own lives.

DON’T BE THE ONE WITHOUT A PLAN

So I challenge you to go ahead and make a plan, set a goal. Start simple. Pick one area of frustration in your life. Maybe it’s your home.

  • That closet that is always exploding.
  • That room that needs to be painted.
  • That kitchen floor that needs to be mopped.
  • That garage that has no room for your cars.
  • Or maybe it’s just the day-to-day clutter that you just can’t get on top of.
  • Maybe it’s the mountain of laundry.
  • Maybe it’s dirty dishes in the sink without respite.

Whatever the case . . .

1. Pick one thing that you want to change.

2. Make a realistic goal, more of a step rather than an end result.

3. Put a timeframe on it.

4. Do it.

What’s that scientific law? An object in motion stays in motion, right? So a big part of your success is to get the ball rolling. Pick a goal word so you have a direction to aim. Write a step to get you started. Then take that step. Stop putting plans (or goals or resolutions or focus words) off and justifying them away because they “don’t work” for you.

Because the problem with plans is that they work.

 

DID THIS STRIKE A CORD WITH YOU? DOES YOUR HOUSE SERVE AS ONE OF THE PRIMARY STRESS POINTS IN YOUR LIFE? HAVE YOU TRIED TO MANAGE YOUR HOME WELL BUT JUST CAN’T STAY ON TOP OF IT? THEN CHECK OUT MY E-BOOK SUSTAINABLE HOME MANAGEMENT, AND YOU CAN LEARN THE THREE FOUNDATIONAL PRINCIPLES THAT WILL ESTABLISH A SUSTAINABLE MANAGED HOME. IT’S ONLY $4.97 AND IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE TO READ ON ANY DEVICE.

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